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Introverts in Retirement

Senior Couple Sitting On Outdoor Seat Together Laughing

As people grow older, their Myers-Briggs personality scores can change, but not much. Those whose scores were extreme on one or more traits tend to soften and move toward the middle. The ISTJ who had a strong thinking (T) score is likely to move a little toward Feeling, with stronger emotional elements in their personality than previously. This blog describes the eight Introverted (I) types in their retirement years. Every combination of traits is represented, making eight in all—Sensing (S) vs Intuition (N), Thinking (T) vs. Feeling (F), and Perceiving (P) vs. Judging (J).

ISTJs in Retirement

Because ISTJs have been responsible, loyal employees all their lives, they’re likely to be enjoy corresponding financial rewards. Thus, most of them enter retirement with investments in place and can look forward to having enough money through the years ahead. Their habits of taking responsibility never end, either in the home or in the community. The main thing is, they get the chance to enjoy hobbies, relationships, and time with friends and family that formerly were unrealistic because of all their work commitments.

ISTPs in Retirement

For ISTPs, retirement is a time they’ve long looked forward to. In their working lives, there was never opportunity to pursue all their hobbies and other pursuits. A few postpone retirement if they get a great deal of satisfaction from their paid employment. Many have volunteer “careers,” which support their strong work ethic. Whatever ISTPs take up to pass the time, their absorption is so complete that they often forget to attend to mundane matters such as eating meals or meeting commitments they’ve made to friends and family.

ISFJs in Retirement

ISFJs have usually done retirement planning in advance. Since they’ve made a habit of saving money most of their adult lives, it’s likely that they have enough to carry them through the years ahead without paychecks. During the years of retirement, ISFJs mostly focus on their children and families, taking part in their lives and helping out wherever they can. They enjoy customs and projects that emphasize the family heritage. Service work continues to be an important theme for them.

ISFPs in Retirement

ISFPs continue to enjoy their friends and families. In their last years of employment, they look forward to retirement and spending more time with the people close to them. In retirement, ISFPs often find that they are loved and valued by the people who know them well. It’s a welcome time for them to enjoy the fruits of many well-tended relationships. They take pleasure in the simple activities of life—gardening, walking, reading, and so on. When grandchildren are being difficult they deal with them in a smooth, friendly, and encouraging way.

INFJs in Retirement

Because of their idealism and commitment to whatever career they’ve chosen, INFJs are likely to enjoy important positions of responsibilities by the time they retire. Financially, they may find their incomes and reserves in good shape without any previous careful strategic planning. They look forward to nurturing family relationships in the years ahead and seeing the foundations they have built for themselves to flourish. They treasure the increased leisure time to reflect and pursue their hobbies without interruption. They can also become further involved in interests they’ve developed but haven’t had much time for, such as writing.

INFPs in Retirement

INFPs in retirement need to look back and feel that their years of employment were worthwhile and had value for the people around them. It’s a time of life when they look forward to a variety of activities, such as travel. They may also strengthen their bond with family members and enjoy the opportunity to spend more leisure hours with them. Some grandparents enjoy special projects designed just for their grandchildren, such as writing stories about them, building a sandbox, and so on.

INTJs in Retirement

The life of the mind is always important to INTJs, during their years of employment and beyond. Some are so involved in their work that they don’t leave their jobs at age 65. If circumstances permit, they stay on, doing the same activities that engrossed them over the years.  They have no time for frivolous pastimes or frivolous people. Scientists and others often continue to attend meetings relevant to their work and stay in touch with colleagues.  INTJs with clear focus but few opportunities to socialize on the job may get lonely during retirement if they haven’t nurtured relationships with people who stimulate them.

INTPs in Retirement

As INTPs mature, they continue their quest for logical purity. Their hobbies reflect their intensity and purposefulness. Each hobby is thoroughly explored and its nuances worked out before the INTP moves on to the next activity. They are strongly cerebral, so whatever they do is matched by deep concentration and much thought. While their external world may have changed, their minds remain the same. Just because they no longer go to work doesn’t mean that their minds aren’t busy. Some onlookers may find that the INTP changes very little upon moving into retirement. They often continue activities that were previously important to them.

 

 

 

Introverted Disney Characters and Their Personality Types: Part 1 of a Two-Part Series

Why do we love Disney characters so much? What is it about their stories that touches our hearts?

We see reflections of own personalities in characters like Jiminy Cricket, Alice in Wonderland, Pocahontas, and even Merlin. If you know your Myers-Briggs personality type, maybe you can relate to some of them. This blog tells you about the introverts (I) among Disney’s colorful animated characters

aliceintpINTP: Alice in Wonderland

Alice in Wonderland is an INTP from a Disney film of that name. The movie opens with Alice sitting by a river, bored and sleepy. Suddenly a white rabbit wearing a waistcoat and pocket watch runs by. True to her adventurous nature, Alice follows him down a rabbit hole, where she falls and falls until she lands in the strange world called Wonderland. Her curious mind leads her into many adventures.

INTPs are introverted (I), intuitive (N), thinking (T), and perceiving (P). They explore creative possibilities using their well-developed intuition. Their ability to take in new information seems endless. Just like Alice in Wonderland, they question everything that happens to them, testing new ideas for accuracy. They are quiet, private and observant. Their brains never stop working.

belleinfpINFP: Belle

Belle, an INFP from the Disney film “Beauty and the Beast,” is magically transported into a land where she meets an ugly beast. She loves the Beast, not knowing that he’s a prince under a spell. Only her love can transform him back to the handsome young prince he once was.

INFPs are introverted (I), intuitive (N), feeling (F), and perceiving (P). With her INFP personality, Belle is always open to new experiences. She is a soft-spoken idealist who dedicates herself to helping others. INFPs have strong values that guide their choices in life. Although they live by self-imposed codes, they don’t burden others with their beliefs. They avoid conflict and try not to tell others what to do. They can be assertive when they need to. They always abide by their deeply rooted code of honor.

jiminycricketisfjISFJ: Jiminy Cricket

In the Disney movie “Pinocchio,” ISFJ Jiminy Cricket is given the job of serving as Pinocchio’s conscience. Jiminy is comical and wise, a companion to Pinocchio in his adventures. After the Disney movie became such a great success, Jiminy Cricket appeared in a series of educational films for grade-schoolers. He showed kids how to steer clear of strangers and warned them about other dangers.

ISFJs are introverted (I), sensing (S), feeling (F), and judging (J). As an ISFJ, Jiminy Cricket is modest, orderly and easygoing, but he has a strong sense of duty. ISFJs put much of their energy into helping others. They can be counted on in times of trouble. ISFJs are practical and down-to-earth and rely on the “now” to guide their thinking and behavior. They’re not much concerned about the future. With little need to control others, the main desire of the ISFJ is to see everyone living in harmony.

pocahantasinfjINFJ: Pocahontas

INFJ Pocahontas, the main character of Disney’s animated film by that name, meets Captain John Smith during early colonial days. The encounter occurs while Smith is exploring the wilderness as his ship’s crew searches for gold. The father of Pocahontas, Chief Powhatan, has ordered her to keep away from the English, but she disobeys. When Smith is captured and about to be put to death, Pocahontas rescues him.

INFJs are introverted (I), intuitive (N), feeling (F), and judging (J). Like all INFJs, Pocahontas is kind, generous and supportive of others. If someone needs help they’re there for them. The integrity of INFJs is evident in everything they do. They’re not outspoken unless they see injustice. Then their actions reflect their ideals. People with problems can rely on INFJs to suggest creative solutions or step in to help in emergencies.

INTJ: Basilbasilintj

INTJ Basil, the main character of Disney’s film “The Great Mouse Detective,” is a brilliant, plucky mouse who refuses to back down in difficult situations. Basil is a jack-of-all-trades and an expert at disguise, even though it sometimes fails. While Basil is typically calm and collected, he can be moody if things don’t go his way. He knows how to be affectionate when someone needs a boost.

INTJs are introverted (I), intuitive (N), thinking (T), and judging (J). They are one of the most independent Myers-Briggs personality types. Sometimes INTJs seem so confident that people find them annoying. They’re occasionally accused of being argumentative. When told this, INTJs can be hurt. That wasn’t their intention. They see themselves as encouraging improvement in others. People of this personality type are good organizers, often rising to leadership positions. They’re good at seeing the big picture.


li-shangistjISTJ: Li Shang

Captain Li Shang is a powerful no-nonsense military man in Disney’s animated film “Mulan.” An ISTJ, he can be harsh in getting his messages across to underlings, but he’s an efficient leader. Li Shang is opinionated about women until he meets Mulan, to whom he is attracted. His social awkwardness is shown by the way he congratulates her for her success in saving China. He tells Mulan, “You fight good.”

ISTJs are introverted (I), sensing (S), thinking (T), and judging (J). They are among the most responsible of Myers-Briggs types. They’re also the most private. In making decisions, they focus on concrete information, missing nothing and taking nothing for granted. They’re not always easy to deal with. While they know how to be cordial when it’s required, it’s usually because they’re trying to be appropriate. Underneath the friendly façade, they remain introverts.

pumbaaisfpISFP: Pumbaa

ISFP Pumbaa, a warthog, is an open-hearted character from Disney’s animated film “The Lion King.” While he sometimes acts like an innocent child, Pumbaa is actually the brains of the outfit. Still, he’s not without his moments of absentmindedness. Pumbaa has a strong sense of loyalty and devotion towards his friends, even when they get into trouble despite his warnings. His courage enables him to rescue Simba.

ISFPs are introverted (I), sensing (S), feeling (F), and perceiving (P). They are more in touch with themselves and the world around them than most other types. They are driven by a love of life and a desire to see and know about everything. They encourage others while not intruding or imposing on them. Because of their gentle, compassionate nature, they may find that other, more assertive types overlook their abilities or take advantage of them.

tinkerbellistpISTP: Tinker Bell

ISTP Tinker Bell is a famous fairy in several animated Disney films. She stands up for the people she cares for, even though she’s not the most tactful fairy in the world. Fearless and determined, she has an active mind. As her name suggests, she’s a tinker. She’s skilled at fixing things, mainly pots and kettles. She also comes up with new inventions to help her friends. Her one weakness is her short temper.

ISTPs are introverted (I), sensing (S), thinking (T), and perceiving (P). As observers of life, they don’t miss much. They’re logical and adaptable to any situation. They can be relied on when immediate action is needed. They need clear goals and are good at working with their hands. ISTPs always look for the most efficient ways to get the job done and ignore details that aren’t important. When things go wrong, unless it’s in their personal lives, they keep a stiff upper lip and move on.

Part 2, Extraverted Disney Characters and Their Personality Types, will follow in the next blog.

INFJ Meets ISFJ

INFJs and ISFJs are alike in many ways. They’re introverted, feeling, and judging. They differ only on the intuitive/sensing dimension of the Myers-Briggs Inventory. Both types put much of their energy into helping others and share a drive to make the world a better place. People can count on them in times of trouble.

Although INFJs and ISFJs have high ideals, they’re modest about them. They prefer to make their values apparent in their actions. This is partly due to their introverted personalities and desire to avoid the spotlight. Seldom do they call attention to themselves or demand recognition for their achievements.

The main difference between INFJs and ISFJs is that INFJs are more perceptive. They pick up on the motives of others quickly. Because they’re so sharp at spotting phony behaviors in people, their judgments are sometimes harsh. On the other hand, ISFJs are somewhat naïve. They have a hard time understanding power-hungry people or those with self-serving motives. They are bewildered by greed and unkindness as it’s so foreign to their natures. INFJs and ISFJs complement each other because they meet somewhere in the middle. INFJs protect ISFJs from their gullibility, and ISFJs are models of tolerance.

Quiet and unassuming, INFJs and ISFJs aren’t easy to get to know, but people close to them value their friendship.

In Love

Both INFJs and ISFJs take romantic relationships seriously and are attentive to their partners’ needs. In their speech and demeanor, they’re tactful and kind. At the same time, their introverted natures make them cautious about expressing their feelings for fear of rejection. These two types may be so cautious in their approach to romance that more extraverted partners get impatient with them. INFJs and ISFJs have a tendency to hold back on the playful aspects of their personalities until they know people well.

INFJs and ISFJs sometimes remain in partnerships that are no longer working. The thought of leaving a relationship makes them nervous and insecure. When either of these types is left by a partner, they’re deeply hurt. Typically, their self-esteem suffers and they go through a period of painful self-examination. If they don’t turn to friends for support, they’re slow to regroup and move on. Some grow quiet, trying to appear composed and stoic to the people around them.

At Home

The homes of INFJs tend to be more cluttered than those of ISFJs. An abundance of books, crafts supplies, musical instruments, and other paraphernalia lie around the house, allowing INFJs to pursue their hobbies at a moment’s notice. While they would prefer a tidy environment, housekeeping has a lower priority than having fun. When family members complain about the mess, however, INFJs will pick up after themselves.

ISFJs’ homes are usually neater, as they’re more prompt about attending to home maintenance and domestic chores. Sometimes their sense of responsibility prompts them to take on more than they can handle. They may complain about their workload in a martyred sort of way, but then turn down offers of assistance from family members. To accept help makes them feel inadequate and guilty.

Celebrations such as birthdays and anniversaries are important to ISFJs, who are more traditional than INFJs. To get the most enjoyment out of such events, they participate enthusiastically in the preparations—cooking the holiday meal, cleaning the house, and so on. This is one way they show their commitment and love.

Both Myers-Briggs types take their parenting responsibilities seriously. For them parenthood is a lifelong commitment. Protective and patient, they’re likely to set aside their own needs to be sure their children are taken care of first. They give them every opportunity for a good education, for example. While ISFJs tend to encourage their children along conventional career lines, INFJs are more broad minded. They’re tolerant of unusual extracurricular and career interests as long as their children put forth genuine effort.

INFJs and ISFJs desire harmony above all. They want their partners and children to be happy. As a result, they sometimes sidestep family conflicts that should be resolved for the good of everyone.

At Work

INFJs and ISFJs need careers that are consistent with their values and desire to serve others. ISFJs are generally satisfied with conventional careers that focus on short-term goals and hands-on attention to detail, while INFJs feel fulfilled only when their intuition and creativity are called into play and they’re involved in long-range planning and problem-solving.

Both personality types are averse to conflicts and stress in the workplace. INFJs can become rigid and uncommunicative in a competitive or intense work environment. Eventually, they look for another job. ISFJs are likely to keep trying, working harder in the hope that the situation will improve.

Growing Older

INFJs and ISFJs enjoy their retirement years if they’re free of financial worries and have leisure time to pursue their interests. INFJs, once preoccupied with world problems, become more relaxed as they grow older, leaving many of their worries behind and enjoying the present. They’re likely to decide that the state of the world is the next generation’s problem.

ISFJs, always more now-oriented than INFJs, also enjoy being released from the time-consuming obligations that characterized their working years. With age, they become less self-critical and more extraverted. Their give their own needs and desires higher priority than they once did. Still, being of service to others remains important.

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