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Career Distribution by Myers-Briggs Type

A 14-year study of thousands of Americans in various careers shows that different Myers-Biggs types have different preferences and skills relating to the jobs they take. When the data were analyzed at the end of the 14 years, researchers found that people of various Myers-Briggs categories most often held the following jobs listed below.

Career Distribution by Myers-Briggs Type

     ISTJ: Administrators in schools, industry, and health care, dentists, police and detectives, auditors and
accountants
    ISFJ: Nurses, clerical supervisors, preschool teachers, librarians, health technicians
    INFJ: Education consultants, clergy, physicians, media specialists, teachers (English, art, drama)
    INTJ: Lawyers, scientists, computer systems analysts, chemical engineers, university teachers
    ISTP: Farmers, mechanics and repairers, electrical technicians, engineers, dental hygienists
    ISFP: Storekeepers and stock clerks, nurses, dental assistants, bookkeepers, mechanics and repairers
    INFP: Psychiatrists and psychologists, writers, artists, and editors, teachers, social workers, musicians and composers
    INTP: Writers, artists and entertainers, computer programmers, social scientists
    ESTP: Marketing personnel, police and detectives, managers and administrators, retail salespeople, auditors
    ESFP: child care workers, receptionists, salespeople, religious workers, teachers (preschool)
    ENFP: Rehabilitation counselors, teachers (art and drama), writers, artists, entertainers, psychologists, clergy
    ENTP: Photographers, marketing personnel, salespeople, journalists, computer systems analysts
    ESTJ: Teachers, school administrators, surgeons, factory and site supervisors, lawyers
    ESFJ: Medical secretaries, clergy, nurses, home economists, hairdressers and cosmetologists
    ENFJ: Clergy, teachers, actors and entertainers, writers and artists, consultants
    ENTJ: Lawyers, managers, mortgage brokers, administrators (computer systems and education), scientists

The study data do not indicate which careers are best for certain types. The information simply reflects what jobs people were holding at the time the study was in progress. It serves mainly to provide helpful information about the demands of each career. When evaluating potential careers, it’s best to consider how your preferences relate to the demands of certain professions. Every career uses some of each of the eight preferences.

Public contact vs working alone: Introversion/Extraversion
Jobs that involve mainly working with others are better for Extraverts, especially if they involve selling, persuading, and motivating. While Introverts are often capable of doing these things, too, they may find themselves drained by the constant interaction with others.

Hands-on activity vs. abstract speculation: Sensing/Intuition
A hands-on profession  appealing to Sensing types is one where “doing” and “bottom line” are the main goals, as in accounting, trial law, and civil engineering. Jobs with short-term, measurable objectives are more attractive to them. In contrast, jobs that require foresight and planning are better suited to Intuitives. Examples are architectural engineering, teaching law (professors), and financial planning.

Objective vs. people-oriented decisions: (Thinking/Feeling)
Thinking jobs are attractive to those concerned mainly with logic and objectivity. They don’t want to be embroiled in personal relationships or human welfare decisions. Careers in the Thinking category include stockbrokers, high-tech research, and military positions. Feelers are attracted to careers involving interpersonal dynamics, such as the clergy, counselors, teachers, and nurses, among others.

Structured demands vs. flexible innovation: (Judging/Perceiving)
Judging types do best in careers that require scheduling and established procedures—everything from bus driving to orthopedic surgery. Jobs that are more open-ended, requiring flexibility and ability to adjust, include journalism, strategic planning and entrepreneurial endeavors.

It’s a Personal Decision

When you consider your own type, such as ISFP, the key is not to choose a career that theoretically belongs on a list, but rather to consider the various facets of your type and how they relate to the job possibilities. A bus driver who travels a short downtown route every day is different from a bus driver transporting senior citizens through the city and acting as their tour guide.

The goal is to find a career that fits your preferences rather than force yourself into a job that theoretically suits your type. The better the personal fit, the less job stress and the more satisfaction you’ll experience in the long run. If you have an opportunity to practice law you might find that the job in question involves representing low-income clients, about whom you feel personal concern. if you’re an INFP you may be tempted to rule out the possibility because the career is not on the master list. Yet the job may be a perfect fit for your type, with its tendency toward compassion and flexibility.

Extraverts in Retirement

With advancing age, their Myers-Briggs personality scores of people can change, but not by much. Extreme scores on one or more traits tend to soften and move toward the middle. The ESTJ who had a strong thinking (T) score is likely to move a little toward Feeling, with stronger emotional elements in their personality than previously. This blog describes the eight Extraverted (E) types in their retirement years. Every combination of traits is represented, making eight in all—Extraverted plus Sensing (S) or Intuition (N), Thinking (T) or Feeling (F), and Perceiving (P) or. Judging (J).

ESTPs in Retirement

ESTP elders continue to have the same characteristics they did when younger. Many of them choose to retire early so they’ll have more time to do the things that are fun. They like activities which require solving problems that are often difficult and tense. While they may take part in various organizations, they avoid leadership positions. Taking charge is not in their repertoire. They become involved mainly for the activities. When grandchildren arrive, the elders take pleasure in outings to the zoo, sports events, and so on. Children love their spontaneity and ability to improvise games on the spot.

ESTJs in retirement

Because ESTJs often have a long history in of employment, their financial needs may be taken care of. However, they’ve become so accustomed to work that the idea of full-time leisure may intimidate them. Unless they’ve developed personally during their younger years to include activities that are flexible and rewarding, they may find retirement difficult. Many compensate by learning to think in terms of priorities and start making lists. Removing the spontaneity factor and therefore absolved from dealing with the emotional content of activities is more comfortable. ESTJs are efficiency devotees. It something is not on their list, they forget about it even though it may be of immediate importance and others may try to sidetrack them.

ESFPs in retirement

In retirement, ESFPs continue their people-oriented life, keeping old friends and continuing to provide the amusement and comradeship of years past. They have an optimism that is contagious and draws others to them. When ESFPs have unfortunate experiences, they’re often able to look at the sunny side. While some nursing home residents despair about their futures, ESFPs are likely to enjoy new friends, freedom from responsibilities, and new activities to participate in. Because their friends of the past have enjoyed them so much over the years, they’re unlikely to abandon the friendship. The want to help out where they can.

ESFJs in retirement

ESFJ elders don’t change much in their relationships after retirement. They keep doing nice, thoughtful things for others, and their company is a pleasure. They continuing scheduling lunches and other outside activities with former colleagues. They make follow-up calls and send notes. If they have grandchildren, they’ll help the parents in any way they can—baby-sitting, picking up the children at school, taking them on outings, and so on. Whatever they can do for others around them to make experiences more enjoyable, they do. It makes them feel good that others appreciate their efforts.

ENFPs in retirement

ENFPs remain young in spirit as they age, maintaining characteristics from their youth such as a zestful enjoyment of life, curiosity, and enthusiasm. As a result, people of all ages, including children, enjoy their company. They look forward to retirement as a time when they’ll be free of the restrictions and boundaries of the work world and can take pleasure in activities for which they’ve never had enough time when employed. Because they look for possibilities before realities, some of their activities may not be considered age-appropriate, such as joining the Peace Corps. However, if they become disabled or suffer from lack of money, they may get depressed because of all the opportunities missed.

ENFJs in retirement

ENFJs leaving full-time employment often look for places to live where they have family and friends or other close personal ties. Relationships and values were always important to this type, but they become even more so in retirement. Many ENFJs who previously did service work on the job, look for similar opportunities on a volunteer basis. They do this gladly, believing that an important goal in life is to help others. One of the lessons many need to learn is to let others help them some of the time. They are so used to giving help that it’s hard for them to imagine accepting it. ENFJs go out of their way to encouraging their grandchildren, reading to them, helping them with homework, etc.

ENTPs in retirement

ENTP have many inspiring ideas and projects during their working years, and these continue into retirement. While they may not have planned financially for these years, they have certainly given a lot of thought to the types of things they dream of doing. However, money may be a problem. Since it’s likely that they’ve changed jobs a number of times, they may have no stable retirement income to depend upon. However, they remain enthusiastic about their ideas and may find other lucrative means of earning a living that use their ingenuity. Some start new businesses that generate enough income to support their interests in old age. The desire for challenge, newness, variety and change don’t disappear as the years pass.

ENTJs in retirement

All their lives, ENTJs have been rewarded with leadership positions at work and in community organizations. They have always had a strategy in which potential for future gain outweighs risks. Because they are hard drivers with strong goal orientation, the prospect of retirement and long lazy days may be daunting to them. Inactivity makes them restless and the thought of filling their time with nothing of consequence dismays them. The chances are that finances are no problem because their careers have been so successful. Many continue to work as consultants to the same firms where they were previously employed. Maintaining autonomy is one of their major retirement goals. They need to learn to rely on others some of the time even though it’s difficult for them.

Extraverted Kids—Myers-Briggs Types

According to the Myers Briggs system of classifying personalities, extraverted children come in eight types. The only trait that runs as a constant thread through all types is Extraversion (I). All these children are outgoing and talkative compared with their quieter counterparts, the eight introverts. The other traits represented in the group of extraverts are Sensing (S) vs. Intuition (N), Thinking (T) vs. Feeling (F), and Perceiving (P) vs. Judging (J).

ESTP—Extraverted (I), Sensing (S), Thinking (T), Perceiving (J)

ESTP children love the taste of freedom. They are energetic and rambunctious. Where the action is—that’s where they want to be. They dislike sitting still, preferring to be outside, involved in energy-intensive activities. They prefer challenges to sitting still and watching life pass them by. If they enjoy school, it’s mainly because the classroom is a place to get together with friends. After-school activities are high on their list of pleasures. If they don’t excel academically, it’s mainly because they want to do things their way in their own time. They favor inanimate objects such as action toys, games, and sports equipment and take good care of them. Pleasing themselves is their aim.

ESTJ— Extraverted (I), Sensing (S), Thinking (T), Judging (J)

ESTJ children tend to be obedient and reliable. They’re also organized and practical. In general, they are action-oriented, rolling up their sleeves for any job at hand and digging in to get the chore done. They’re quick to decide on practical aims and set them into motion. They figure out what needs to be acted on, follow through, and finish on time. They like closure. They make sure everyone else is doing their job, too—often a source of irritation for other types. They are best at tasks that require organization and structure and come to a conclusive end. They like activities in which winners are rewarded with trophies and badges (such as soccer and Scouts). ESTJ children want to do things properly and will voluntarily sign up for class or lessons. The planning alone brings comfort to them.

ESFP—Extraverted (I), Sensing (S), Feeling (F), Perceiving (P)

ESFP children are naturally warm, active, and drawn to other people. They are concerned about the welfare and safety of those around them. They use touch as a way to show that they care. It’s difficult to ignore ESFP children because they are so oriented to the present, particularly where others are concerned. They are even open to strangers, an inclination that sometimes worries parents. They often sense what’s going on before anyone else notices. Their dispositions are bright and sunny. The enjoy laughing at themselves and others. It’s hard to find them sitting still. Because of their outgoing dispositions, they have many loyal friends. They’re popular in school. At their best, ESFPs meet the needs of their friends and families in lively, fun ways.

ESFJ—Extraverted (I), Sensing (S), Feeling (T), Judging (J)

ESFJ children want life to be secure, harmonious and structured. Parents can count on them to get their chores done reliably and responsibly. They finish whatever they start. They follow the rules and guidelines given to them, accepting them as fair and reasonable, on the whole. When they disagree with any of them, they feel betrayed by the “system.”  It’s important to them that they receive approval and praise for what they accomplish. Pleasing their elders is important to them. They will go to great lengths to help people in trouble or in pain. ESFJs radiate warmth and acceptance and fit in well with their classmates. They may be active in several clubs or after-school activities to enjoy the fellowship of friends. In groups of other children, they are sometimes viewed as “peacemakers”—children who know how to smooth over disagreements.

ENTP—Extraverted (I), Intuitive (N), Thinking (T), Perceiving (P)

ENTP children are lively and questioning. They don’t work or play according to established guidelines. They find their own way. They have faith in their ability to improvise and find workable solutions to any problems that arise. They value innovation, and flexibility. Telling ENTP children that they must follow certain traditions is like inviting rebellion.  However, they are also good a persuading people to see things their way. They use their ingenuity and cleverness to bring others around to their personal perspective of the situation. They are often several steps ahead of their peers and even grownups in facing challenges of the present and future. Change and innovation are the kind of environment they thrive in. Even at a young age, their entrepreneurial skills are at hand to push against all odds, furthering their projects.

ENTJ—Extraverted (E), Intuitive (N), Thinking (T), Judging (J)

ENTJ children need objectives for everything—better grades than anyone else, winning contests, beating other contestants in various kinds of competitions. They take charge of themselves effectively and often other people, as well. They aim fora measurable. observable goals. ENTJs have a strong desire to take control and shape the goals of others.  They want structure and order in their lives. When others formulate the guidelines, ENTJs will go along with them if the guidelines seem reasonable. If not, they will rebel and attempt to change the rules. They are excellent time managers. All in all, they enjoy a diverse lifestyle and are engaged in different extracurricular activities—of which they are often leaders, chairs, or captains. They pursue leadership roles very clearly and are competitive in attaining them. However, if someone more competent comes along, they will glad accede to the person. They are at their best using their strategic and analytical thought patterns. They keep their environments as orderly as possible.

ENFP—Introverted (I), Intuitive (N), Feeling (T), Perceiving (J)

ENFP are among the most curious of all the types. Their questions are endless, often starting with the word “Why?” when they play, their inventions are endless. Rarely are they satisfied with traditional toys or conventional ways of playing with them. Their innovations are rarely practical but they satisfy the ENFP’s creative urge—plays, sidewalk sales, made-up languages. Because of their rich imaginations and ability to improvise, they enjoy play-acting drawing, writing, and just day-dreaming. The excitement of being with an ENFP rewards them with many friends. They are agreeable, outgoing, sociable children who like to think about the future. When with friends, they’ll spend hours discussing whom they will marry, where they’ will settle down and what their careers will be. They don’t like closing options and will often decide upon mutually exclusive occupations (nurse, actress) without feeling the need to close out any of them. Their fearless, adventurous spirit often finds them in the role of initiators of change. They appreciate the needs of others and often ready to help them out.

ENFJ—Introverted (I), Intuitive (N), Feeling (T), Judging (P)

ENFJ children are friendly, lively, and cooperative. They are pleasant, outgoing, and talkative. They enjoy being with other people and are responsible in their actions and social responsibilities. ENFJs are constantly on the go, participating in a wide variety of activities—not only for the opportunities and adventure, but also for the chance to interact with other children. They are at their best facilitating cooperation among their peers and smoothing out any disharmony. They will often sacrifice their own convenience and desires to satisfy the needs of their peer group. ENFJs are uncomfortable with conflict. They are capable and persuasive communicators. They’re often given leadership roles because of this tendency. They focus on interpersonal values and concentrate on the best aspects of any group they belong to, as well as the pleasing qualities of their friends and peers. Whatever tasks they undertake must have a spiritual element, even if it’s just camaraderie.

 

Myers-Briggs Personality Types of Children—Extraverted Kids

Do children’s personalities remain consistent over the years? If they’re happy babies, will they be happy adults? Or do experiences early in life play a major role in what they become?

Psychologists believe that both are true. According to experts in Myers-Briggs personality testing, people are born with certain traits or tendencies. Their attitudes and behaviors may be modified by the environment over time, but they don’t disappear entirely. The child who likes to play catch and climb trees will probably be an athletic grown-up. The one who reads books in her room for hours is more likely to be a scholar.

A previous blog described introverted children—quiet, shy types. This one is about extraverted (I) children—kids who are outgoing and enjoy social activities. There are eight types of extraverts according to Myers-Briggs theory. They differ in the combinations of the other three pairs of traits on the personality test: 1) sensing (S) and intuition (N); 2) feeling (F) and thinking (T); and 3) perceiving (P) and judging (J). The scores on four pairs range from one extreme to another, with some close to the middle.

Sensing (S) kids are observant and aware of all the details around them. Intuitive (N) types are more thoughtful and rely on hunches. Feeling (F) children make decisions based on how they’ll affect other people. Those of the thinking (T) type depend on logic and are less likely to focus on outcomes. Perceiving (P) children are easy-going and move from one activity to another. Those with a judging (J) preference are more focused and like to finish things.

Rambunctious Kids
ESTP: Extraverted, Sensing, Thinking and Perceiving

estp-kidESTP children are rambunctious kids. They think their lives should be action-packed and full of fun. When things get boring, they stir them up. Because of their outgoing personalities, they make friends easily and enjoy group activities.

Many are good at sports and work hard to improve their athletic skills. Dancing and other physical activities that involve cooperation also appeal to them. They appreciate nature and are curious about the things they find outdoors. They like being in the fresh air. School is less important to them than real-life experience and socializing. Parents who look for high academic achievement in their ESTP offspring may be disappointed by the grades they bring home.

Responsible Kids
ESTJ: Extraverted, Sensing, Thinking and Judging

estj-kidESTJ children are logical and organized. They’re responsible, obedient kids, respecting the standards set by adults. They get upset when grown-up rules are changed suddenly—unless they’re given a clear reason. For fun, they enjoy doing things that produce results, such as competing in games. Follow-through is their motto. They don’t understand people who go about things in a haphazard way.

When ESTJ kids take up sports or hobbies, they go to great pains to do them well. The child who wants to learn gymnastics, for example, is diligent about getting to all the practices. They like to have their skills tested. Indeed, they like to have all their accomplishments measured. Parents find that coaching and lessons usually pay off for these kids.

Affectionate Kids
ESFP: Extraverted, Sensing, Feeling and Perceiving

esfp-kidChildren of the ESFP personality type show their generous, caring nature from the time they’re toddlers. They’re warm, active and full of life. They like to be held and show affection by touching people. They want to bring happiness to those around them. Sometimes, though, they’re self-conscious whey they’re on the receiving end.

ESFPs have sharp eyes. Very little escapes their attention. They tune into the moods of people and notice subtleties in their behaviors. They like to include others in their activities. As observers of life, they point out interesting things to family and friends. These bright and sunny children sail though life with little caution. Parents sometimes worry about their willingness to take risks.

Generous Kids
ESFJ: Extraverted, Sensing, Feeling and Judging

esfj-kidChildren with ESFJ personalities are responsible and cooperative. They thrive on praise and personal attention. They’ll put forth considerable effort to gain approval from grown-ups and friends. ESFJs try to do the right thing. Always concerned about the well being of others, they go out of their way to help those in distress—even when it involves making personal sacrifices.

As children, they like order and structure. They follow the rules and generally accept them without question. They’re upset by out-of-bounds behavior in other children. People who tell lies also disturb them. When the rules seem unreasonable, ESFJ kids may feel let down by the grown-ups who made them.

Creative Kids
ENFP: Extraverted, Intuitive, Feeling and Perceiving

enfp-kidThe natural curiosity of ENFP children leads them into endless adventures. They are full of questions. Fueled by their creativity, the spend hours exploring new ways to spend their time—making sand castles, rearranging indoor furniture for their adventures, making up plays, and so on.

The charm and energy of ENFP kids attracts friends. Because they’re so persuasive, they’re often chosen as leaders by their peers. They like to experiment, even if it involves taking risks. If someone warns them that poison ivy is dangerous, they’re likely to test the person’s advice. Parents of ENFP offspring often worry about what they’ll get into next.

Sociable Kids
ENFJ: Extraverted, Intuitive, Feeling and Judging

enfj-kidENFJ children are cooperative and lively. Once they learn to talk, they never seem to stop. These congenial extraverts need lots of social interaction. Conflict and arguments upset them.

Bright, and sunny, ENFJ kids are always on the go. At school, they sign up for many activities, not just for the experience, but also for a chance to socialize. They bring warmth and vision to whatever they take part in. They’re at their best in situations that call for sensitivity and tact. ENFJs are liberal with praise for others and are well liked. Parents find them a joy to be around.

Risk-Taking Kids
ENTP: Extraverted, Intuitive, Thinking and Perceiving

entp-kidENTPs are lively children who question routine ways of doing things. They rarely accept rules without question. If a requirement seems unreasonable, they try to get around it. Then they justify their behavior with logical explanations.

Because these children love challenges, they often engage in risky behaviors. Frequently, they try to outwit authority figures such as parents and teachers. Due to their appealing personal style, it’s easy for them to persuade other children to join them in projects and adventures. Organizers at heart, they even assign roles to them. Parents of ENTP kids do well to have logic on their side when challenged by their offspring.

Goal-Driven Kids
ENTJ: Extraverted, Intuitive, Thinking and Judging

entj-kidENTJ children are driven by goals from the time they’re very young. They can be scholarly, athletic, and creative—all at the same time. They’re like to get straight As in school—as much to satisfy themselves as to please their parents. It’s important for them to win games and come in first in competitions. They like to win.

Kids of the ENTJ type tend to take charge of themselves and others in group activities. They’re born leaders. Power and control are important to them because they want to have an impact on what goes on. When authority figures become too dogmatic, ENTJs rebel. If a situation is acceptable to them, they’ll go along. For parents who’d prefer easy-going, compliant offspring, these children can be a challenge.

 

Part 1 of  this two-part series described introverted children.

Famous People and Their Myers-Briggs Personality Types—Part 1: The Extraverts

In recent years, Myers-Briggs experts have analyzed many famous people to make educated guesses of their personality types. While most celebrities, past and present, have never taken a personality test, psychologists who are knowledgeable about typology believe they know what the outcomes would be.

Most politicians, entertainers, and leaders of large organizations are extraverts. Introverts are usually deep thinkers, complex individuals who can be charming in public but are private in their personal lives. Introverts aren’t easily categorized or put in boxes. Part 1 of this two-part series describes some extraverts, living and dead. Part 2 about introverts will follow.

Famous Extraverts of the Present

ENTJ: Bill Gates
Extraverted, Intuitive, Thinking and Judging

04-billgatesAn ENTJ personality type called the “Leader,” Bill Gates has always been decisive and strategic, willing to challenge old ideas and attract other people to his causes. ENTJs can be demanding, but they’re also objective and fair. Bill Gates built an empire based on his leadership skills and ability to innovate.

ENFJ: Oprah Winfrey
Extraverted, Intuitive, Feeling and Judging

05-oprahwinfrey_2005With her outgoing, enthusiastic personality, ENFJ Oprah understands people. True to type, she’s articulate and tactful. ENFJs have the interpersonal skills to make others want to join them to make things happen. The ENFJ is idealistic, compassionate, and shows integrity in everything he or she does.

ESTJ: Margaret Thatcher
Extraverted, Sensing, Thinking and Judging

07-thatcherAs the “Supervisor” ESTJ type, Margaret Thatcher was the first female prime minister of England—a decisive, organized woman. Like most ESTJs, Thatcher was direct, objective and often impersonal. She based her plans of action on logic and past experience, monitoring progress every step of the way.

ESFJ: Barbara Walters
Extraverted, Sensing, Feeling and Judging

08-waltersA congenial, tactful ESFJ, Barbara Walters is an American media star. Compassion and thoroughness are her hallmarks. Called the “Caretaker,” this personality type places a high value on harmony. The cooperative nature of ESFJs make them naturals for drawing out other people while respecting their sensitivities and needs.

ESFP: Steven Spielberg
Extraverted, Sensing, Feeling and Perceiving

16-spielbergSteven Spielberg, famous Hollywood director, is an ESFP, a personality type called the “Performer.” Spielberg has been honored in many countries for his ground-breaking films. He is outgoing, flexible and observant. With his lighthearted approach to life, like most ESFPs he is generous with his time and money.

ENTP: Barack Obama
Extraverted, Intuitive, Thinking and Perceiving

01-obamaAs a Myers-Briggs ENTP, Barack Obama is outspoken, creative, and analytical. Congenial ENTPs have a sixth sense for the needs of others and go out of their way to help them. The interpersonal skills of this personality type attract others. They’re able to unite people to work for their causes.

Famous Extraverts of the Past

ENFP: Walt Disney
Extraverted, Intuitive, Feeling and Perceiving

02-disneyTrue to his Myers-Briggs personality type, ENFP, Walt Disney was creative and independent—a pioneer of animated films. Like most ENFPs, he was congenial, insightful, and versatile. His ability to identify with others was almost uncanny, as made evident from his wide range of film characters.

ESTP: John F. Kennedy
Extraverted, Sensing, Thinking and Perceiving

10-jfkAs an ESTP personality type called the “Promoter,” John F. Kennedy was persuasive, energetic, and easy-going. This Myers-Briggs type is practical and action-oriented, always ready to join in whatever is happening. True to type, Kennedy was direct in his politics, mincing no words while being tactful with those around him.

 

 

 

Extraverted Animals and Their Myers-Briggs Personality Types

Animals have complex personalities. Some seem almost human. Those of us who love dogs and cats know this, but wild creatures are a different story. They live in worlds apart from us, so we underestimate their intelligence, intuition and altruism. They’re not simple beings. They’re as varied as we are.

In another blog, we describe introverted (I) animals: the owl, sloth, deer, octopus, wolf, beaver, meerkat, and house cat. Here we describe the more sociable species, the extraverted (E) animals: the fox, lion, otter, dolphin, honeybee, parrot, elephant, and dog.

ESTP: Fox

Extraverted, Sensing, Thinking and Perceiving
estp-foxLike most ESTPs, foxes look for pleasure in life and want to share it with others. ESTPs are charismatic and dramatic. They’re spontaneous and fun to watch. They know how to influence those around them. In this respect, foxes are like their ESTP human counterparts. If you’re looking for a good time, foxes will quickly endear themselves to you. They’re also quick-witted and can be tricky.

The jury is still out on foxes as pets. Farmers who keep chickens don’t have much good to say about foxes because they raid henhouses. However, some fox breeds have been domesticated to live with people. Families who adopt them say they’re as much fun as dogs and cats but more trouble. They must be kept in secure outdoor enclosures when not watched as they’re escape artists. Because of their high energy, owners need to provide them with tunnels, balls and chew toys. Left free to roam in the house, they make a mess. Also, they’re expensive to keep, considering vet bills alone.

ENTJ: Lion

Extraverted, Intuitive, Thinking and Judging

 entj-lionAs ENTJs, lions are independent, logical thinkers. They live in packs called “prides.” Because they’re thinking (T) types, they don’t let emotions enter their decision-making process. That’s why they’re often seen as callous. But these fierce cats can be warm and nurturing with members of their group. They’re caring parents, protective of their cubs and relatives. At the same time, they’re enterprising and powerful. Just like ENTJ people.

The stories of lions as pets almost always have a bad ending. While lions are cute and cuddly as kittens, they have another 15 years of life to live as wild animals. Nothing can change their instinctive nature. There’s a good reason people don’t keep big cats in their homes. Families lose their homeowner’s insurance, their neighbors hate them, and they get frequent visits from the police, not to mention federal and state wildlife officers. And then there’s the expense of feeding them. Lions need to eat about 10 pounds of raw meat daily at least five days a week.

ESFP: Otter

Extraverted, Sensing, Feeling and Perceiving

esfp-otter As ESFPs, otters revel in the moment. They live at top speed. They’re playful, generous with others of their species, and always see the bright side of life. They love having new adventures with their friends. Learning things in a routine way is not their thing. They like to experiment. They’re intelligent and creative. The object of life is to have a good time and eat well, lying on their backs cracking open shellfish or zooming around underwater looking for fish.

Do otters make good pets? It’s almost impossible to own an otter safely and keep it happy unless you own a lake. If otters are taken in the house, they produce a strong smell. They can spray like a skunk. Some bite when they’re displeased. They have sharp claws and teeth. Plus, they eat several pounds of seafood a day, which could put quite a dent in a grocery budget.

ENFP: Dolphin

Extraverted, Intuitive, Feeling and Perceiving

enfp-dolphinDolphins are so sociable that they make friends not only with their own kind but with other species such as humans. They’re keenly aware of the feelings and needs of those around them. They aim to please. Like most ENFPs, dolphins enjoy company and are seldom out on their own. They have boundless energy and enthusiasm. It’s not unusual for beach-goers to see groups of them playing offshore, performing in the water like synchronized swimmers. ENFPs, including dolphins, get bored easily and are always ready for new adventures.

Dolphins are not pets. Many people even question the ethics of keeping them in water parks. The capture of dolphins in the sea is a violent event and causes the families of these intelligent water mammals much pain—not unlike that felt by human families that have had a child kidnapped. Kids and adults who watch them perform are usually delighted. Animal welfare people take a different view.

ESTJ: Honeybee

Extraverted, Sensing, Thinking and Judging

estj-beeESTJ honeybees are civic-minded creatures that try to improve their society, organize their environment, and make improvements. They’re perfect counterparts to ESTJ humans. They’re good at making their needs and desires known. As strong believers in the letter of the law, they follow rules and regulations. No-nonsense bees are practical and direct and have little use for new experiences. Bees live in a complex, cooperative society.

Needless to say, there’s no such thing as a pet bee. However, humans have kept bee colonies since the Paleolithic Age, as shown in cave drawings. While many people keep bees for their honey, others use them to pollinate trees and plants. In recent years, urban bee-keeping has become popular. Families feed the bees by planting flowers that provide nectar and pollen. Just as ESTJ humans are “busy bees,” these tiny animals perform many chores: cleaning, making wax, repairing their hive, and feeding their young.

ENTP: Parrot

Extraverted, Intuitive, Thinking and Perceiving

entp-parrotENTPs value intelligence and skill over all other things. They’re often described as witty, bright and resourceful. Parrots, the perfect ENTPs, can speak, hold conversations with their human owners, and even make jokes. They like to analyze every side of things and are creative thinkers and workers. They take pleasure in the company of others. ENTPs enjoy a constant flow of inspiration and jump from one challenge to another.

While parrots are hard to resist as pets because of their beauty and intelligence, owners often get more than they bargained for. The screeching and chattering can get tiresome. Parrots are cute when young but demanding when they reach adulthood. And they’re a long-term commitment, as they can live to be fifty years old. The exceptional minds of these birds make them both a joy and a challenge. Some talk and behave at the level of a three-year-old child. Parrots need an enormous amount of attention and care, more than most people can provide.

ESFJ: Elephant

Extraverted, Sensing, Feeling and Judging
esfj-elephantLike their human ESFJ counterparts, elephants are genuine and authentic. They care deeply for each other. ESFJ elephants bring out the best in those around them. They’re loyal and responsible to their families and members of their herd.They are tolerant of the faults of others. However, they’re also sensitive and their feelings are easily hurt.

Elephants are among the world’s most intelligent animals. They have larger brains than humans. They are highly compassionate and kind, even coming to the aid of other species—including humans. Because of the high intelligence and strong family ties of elephants, many believe that it’s morally wrong for humans to capture them and use them for entertainment, work or other purposes. Howeve, few people even think about getting a pet elephant. Those who do are signing up for enormous responsibility and expense. Elephants eat over 400 pounds of fodder and other foods per day.

ENFJ: Dog

Extraverted, Intuitive, Feeling and Judging

enfj-dogLike ENFJ people, dogs like to have a wide variety of friends. Dogs who are confined alone often become depressed and irritable. Dogs are cheerleaders and love to greet their families with a face lick and wagging tail. They feel good when those around them feel good.They are the picture of loyalty, which they give freely and accept joyfully. Usually, they adapt to new groups easily, as can be witnessed at any dog park. They are truly team players.

Dogs, all descended from the grey wolf thousands of years ago, come in a variety of shapes and sizes. Over 300 breeds of dogs are now recognized, ranging in size from the tiny Chihuahua to the huge Great Dane and St. Bernard. More than any other animal, dogs understand humans and bond with them. They learn easily. They’re hard workers, too, rounding up sheep and cows, doing police work, and even guiding the blind and disabled. Many families feel their homes wouldn’t be complete without a dog.

 

Extraverted Disney Characters and Their Personality Types: Part 2 of a Two-Part Series

 

Why do we love Disney characters so much? What is it about their stories that touches our hearts?

We see reflections of own personalities in characters like Jiminy Cricket, Alice in Wonderland, Pocahontas, and even Merlin. If you know your Myers-Briggs personality type, maybe you can relate to some of them. This blog tells you about the extraverts (E) among Disney’s colorful animated characters

buzzlightyearentjENTJ: Buzz Lightyear

Buzz Lightyear, a toy space ranger in “Toy Story,” is known for his bravery and courage. ENTJ Buzz believes in following the rules. Though a great leader, he’s sometimes impulsive and demanding. He’s a skilled warrior in hand-to-hand combat and stays in peak physical condition. In “Toy Story 2,” Buzz leads a toy gang to rescue Woody, who has been captured by a greedy toy collector.

ENTJs are extraverted (E), intuitive (N), thinking (T), and judging (J). In real life, ENTJs are born leaders. Confident and outgoing, they have a need to run things. To them, life is full of people who can transform their visions into realities. To the ENTJ, the world is a treasure trove of possibilities, all of them within reach. They can be hard on people who fail to live up to their standards.

 

 

merlinenfjENFJ: Merlin

ENFJ Merlin, the wizard of Disney’s animated film “The Sword and the Stone,” is so wise that he can see into the future. He can enchant objects and people. As Merlin travels through time, he learns much about the past, present and future. His wisdom, with its depth and complexity, sometimes leaves others confused. Despite his brains, he can be absent-minded and clumsy.

ENFJs are extraverted (E), intuitive (N), feeling (F), and judging (J). They have a sixth sense for people’s needs and get pleasure from helping them. They make others want to join them to make things happen. ENFJs are quick to show their appreciation to others and are generally well liked. Because they’re so enthusiastic and skilled verbally, they’re often encouraged to take leadership positions.

 

 

robinhoodentpENTP: Robin Hood

In the animated Disney film “Robin Hood,” the characters are all animals. Robin, cast as a fox, is an ENTP. He heads a band of outlaws who help the poor people of Nottingham. The village has been reduced to poverty by evil Prince John’s unfair taxation. With the help of his band, Robin Hood disguises himself as a beggar and steals Prince John’s loot to give back to the villagers. After many hair-raising adventures, he is reunited with his childhood sweetheart Maid Marian and they go off to live happily ever after.

ENTPs are extraverted (E), intuitive (N), thinking (T), and perceiving (P). Robin Hood is a true ENTP, called the “Explorer” type. ENTPs are always involved in activities that make themselves and others happy. They jump from one challenge to another, often getting more enthusiastic about thinking up new projects than finishing old ones. Their ability to see the big picture is what motivates their creativity. No matter where they are, they have ideas about how things can be improved. Sometimes they seem almost clairvoyant.

arielenfpENFP: Ariel

ENFP Ariel, Disney’s main character in “The Little Mermaid,” is a strong, determined girl who lives in an underwater kingdom. The 16-year-old mermaid spends most of her time outside the palace walls singing, daydreaming, and sharing adventures with her best friends, a guppy and a crab. She falls in love with Prince Eric, a human, but she has to suffer many trials and tribulations before her father, King Triton, transforms her into human form so she can live happily ever after with her true love.

ENFPs are extraverted (E), intuitive (N), feeling (F), and perceiving (P). They are gracious and tolerant types, able to identify with the thoughts and feelings of others. Adventurous ENFPs are always open to new experiences. They get special pleasure from traveling to distant places. It gives them the chance to meet interesting people in other cultures. With their congenial, open personalities, they sometimes go too far with their enthusiasm and suffer through periods of confusion. They need a friend to help pull them through.

dodgerestpESTP: Dodger

ESTP Dodger, from the Disney movie “Oliver and Company,” is a street-smart Jack Russell Terrier. Appointed as the leader of Fagin’s dog gang of thieves, Dodger is witty, confident, good-hearted and cool. The little dog is clever and crafty and always knows how to get out of scrapes. As Oliver’s best friend, he says he doesn’t eat cats because of “too much fur.”

ESTPs are extraverted (E), sensing (S), thinking (T), and perceiving (P). ESTPs are quick-thinking and action-oriented. As outgoing, lively, and entertaining types, they can be found wherever the action is. They’re at their best dealing with situations that call for a no-nonsense approach. They’re direct with their comments, mincing no words. They also aren’t afraid of taking risks. They’re willing to play for high stakes in the hope of reward.

snowwhiteesfjESFJ: Snow White

The main character in Disney’s animated movie “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves” is a beautiful young princess living with an evil stepmother. Snow White, an ESFJ, is so innocent that she can see no evil in the world. This makes her a target for her jealous stepmother, who plots to kill her with a poisoned apple. Only the kiss of a handsome prince is able to wake her from a “sleeping death.”

ESFJs are extraverted (E), sensing (S), feeling (F), and judging (J). Snow White shows the nurturing side of the ESFJ personality as she looks after the Seven Dwarves in their forest home. At their best, ESFJs are good at taking care of others and meeting their needs. They are congenial, loyal and responsible, placing a high value on harmony. They need concrete priorities in their lives that are clear and practical.

timonesfpESFP: Timon

Timon is the carefree meerkat in “The Lion Kingdom.” An ESFP with a fun-loving attitude, he spends lazy days with his best friend Pumbaa. When Simba the lion cub comes along, they welcome him. Later, when Simba decides to challenge his evil Uncle Scar, Timon shows what friendship means and helps rescue Simba. Timon is a good friend.

ESFPs are extraverted (E), sensing (S), feeling (F), and perceiving (P). They are outgoing, fun-loving types drawn to the company of others. Because of their positive attitude, they’re usually well liked. They’re helpful and are generous with their resources. In fact, they’d rather give than receive. They feel self-conscious when praised too much or singled out for favorable attention. ESFPs notice everything, picking up subtleties that escape others. Downturns in luck shouldn’t be taken too seriously, they believe.

woodyestjESTJ: Woody

In Disney’s animated film “Toy Story,” Woody is a vintage cowboy doll, the favorite toy of a boy named Andy. An ESTJ, Woody is a determined character who tries to keep others on his side. Still, he has a lot of doubt and sadness. He hides feelings from friends so he’ll seem brave, but he’s not afraid to confront them sometimes.

ESTJs are extraverted (E), sensing (S), thinking (T), and judging (J). They are natural organizers. They’re dependable, practical and develop action plans based on logic and experience. Then they roll up their sleeves to pitch in. They keep track of progress to make sure everything is done right. ESTJs are at their best solving concrete problems. Abstract thinking is difficult for them. From their point of view, it’s often pointless.

Part 1 of this two-part series, Extraverted Disney Characters and Their Personality Types, appears in an earlier blog.

Prevalence of INFJs in the General Population

According to researchers, the INFJ Myers-Briggs type occurs in about 1% of the population—the lowest prevalence of any type. Studies vary regarding the exact percentages of the 16 types, but INFJs always walk away with the prize for the most rare.

The downside of being an INFJ is that there are few people out there with whom they can relate deeply. Also, they don’t fit into social norms because their qualities are unusual and, to some people, unsettling. INFJs can size up others quickly and those who don’t like to be sized up are likely to avoid them. Friends and colleagues find many INFJs almost clairvoyant.

The upside for INFJs is that they have gifts not common in other types. This makes them valued as leaders, workers, and friends. They also have rich interior lives.

In work settings, INFJs collaborate well with the second rarest type, ENTJs—also known as the CEO type. While ENTJs prefer the footlights, INFJs are happy to operate behind the scenes. Both types are intuitive; when they combine their insights they make a formidable team. INFJs can soften the edges of ENTJs, who prefer logic and rationality and are often insensitive to the feelings of others. The quiet, tactful INFJ can steer the ENTJ away from decisions that will alienate colleagues. Since the two share a Judging preference, the two types can forge productive partnerships and get a lot done.

At the other end of the scale are the three most prevalent types, shown in dark green: the ISTJ, ESFJ, and ISFJ. Each constitutes between 11% and 14% of the general population, for a total of over 35%. The ISTJ, sometimes called the Inspector, is reliable, works conscientiously, and follows rules and regulations. INFJs and ISTJs often have trouble understanding each other, probably because they have neither intuition nor feeling in common. ESFJs, called Harmonizers, are friendly facilitators. ISFJs, called Protectors, live to serve others often at the expense of their own interests. The ESFJs and ISFJs are liked and admired by most people.
prevalence